Archives

Found 8 Accolades
  • 2017

Laugh Out Loud Culture

Author: Esgar Lopez
Abstract:

Laugh Out Loud Culture was my research study on how technology and its antecedents changed American culture into what it is now. This paper focuses more on how social media, news media, cell phones and other electronics now defines American culture appose to culture was before the introduction of the internet.

  • 2017

The Utility-Squared Project: Design Framework for Achieving the Sustainable Centralization of Municipal Utility Services in Developing Countries and Emerging Markets

Author: Robert Hanlon
Abstract:

The modern, urbanized society has become reliant on five key services to sustain a healthy and functioning populace, at any measurable scale; (1) access to a stable food supply, (2) availability of treated (potable) water, (3) the effective removal and treatment of wastewater, (4) the proper disposal of municipal solid waste, and (5) the availability of usable energy (e.g. electricity, fuel). As the recent decade has demonstrated, the stability and global status of a nation at large may be compromised if these services are interrupted, compromised, or simply not provided at the necessary capacities. The Utility2 Project presented in this paper represents the framework for an organization, comprised of two components; the U1 Program and U2 Facility, which deliver the five key services for an underserviced population. While developed countries and societies benefit from an established and functioning system of utility infrastructure and provisions, the prospective Target Locations for this design study are not as fortunate; the Utility2 Project implements a grass-roots approach in developing regions, presently void of such services or providers, like so many that currently exist in emerging markets and developing countries (e.g. India, southeast Asia, Eastern Europe), along with the many war-torn regions left without functioning municipalities and infrastructure. Using a combination of novel technologies, Big-Picture engineering, and a Projectized Organization with non-profit-values, the Utility2 Project’s objective is to provide a readily feasible solution to this global problem.

  • 2017

The Matryoshka Doll of the Russian Identity

Author: Trevor Yoak
Abstract:

Given the current political climate and the whimsy which plagues policy relating to Russia, all members of the electorate need to self-educate in order to increase awareness and the wherewithal to make rational decisions about American foreign policy. This paper unpacks some of the mystery and confusion of why Russia acts in certain ways by analyzing the transformation of the Russian identity throughout many eras. Delving into the cultural, historical, and religious aspects of how the average Russian views himself begins to give shape to the jigsaw, ultimately revealing common ground and talking points for future relations.

  • 2017

Analysis of a malicious executable with embedded executable

Author: Anthony LaForte
Abstract:

This report is based on analysis of two malicious executables discovered in the employee reported SPAM folder. The first executable was encrypted and contained another malicious executable within its own resource section. The hidden executable is a user-space key logger used to steal information typed into the computer. This malicious binary has a high probability of AV detection.

  • 2017

Indonesia: Archetype for Countering the Effects of the Islamic State?

Author: Daniel Snyder
Abstract:

Indonesia has proven to be successful in isolating itself from violent extremist activities that have plagued other Muslim and Western European nations over the past ten years.  Although the current population is predominately Muslim, and influences of the faith are embedded in their political system; Indonesia does not contribute radicalized foreign fighters overseas in support of radical Islamic causes at the same rate as other smaller Muslim nations. It is assessed that the entrenched regional and ancestral links outline a broadminded methodology towards equality that may prove to be an ethnic archetype for other Muslim dominated populations to duplicate.

  • 2017

Challenges and Risks in the Adoption and Implementation of Building Information Modeling in the Architectural, Engineering and Construction Industry

Author: Neway Mengesha
Abstract:

The use of Building Information Modelling (BIM) in the Architectural, Engineering and Construction (AEC) industry is growing rapidly. BIM has changed the way projects are executed in the AEC industry. However, the adoption and implementation of BIM in the AEC industry has encountered many challenges and risks. The focus of this project is to identify and examine the factors that hinder the adoption and implementation process of BIM and the risks involved for using BIM in projects in the AEC industry. First, the theoretical concepts of BIM and its benefits in the AEC industry are discussed. Second, the factors that influence the adoption and implementation of BIM as well as the challenges in the AEC industry are widely presented. Then, legal/contractual and technical risks involved in the BIM process are identified and examined. Finally, the impacts of BIM in terms of the risks to the architects/engineers, contractors, and owners are evaluated. The data and information has been administered through literature reviews and previously studied case studies to illustrate the benefits and risks for using BIM in the AEC industry.

  • 2017

Reducing the Negative Effects of Tribalism: Promoting Character Building and Cooperation in Today’s Combat Forces

Author: Luke Knapp
Abstract:

In the majority of conflicts that the United States and its Western allies are currently engaged, counter-insurgency operations are the preferred method of operation against irregular enemies such as the Afghani Taliban and the self-proclaimed Islamic State of Daesh. This style of warfare requires appealing to the local populace and working well with the partner nation’s forces, yet U.S. military operations often engender two dispositions among its troops that may inhibit such cooperative efforts. These two dispositions are predatory aggression caused by prolonged engagement in combat and tribalism growing out of small unit cohesion. While not inherently counterproductive, they can cloud the warfighter’s mind and cause him to make poor ethical decisions. A careful look at these dispositions leads one to deduce they are both natural among soldiers and may assist in accomplishing conventional, military versus military missions.  However, the inability of warfighters to realign to the new fight against an irregularly structured enemy and relinquish the biases created by predatory aggression and tribalism may cause mission failure. Measures to address these naturally developing dispositions among the combat troops should focus on character development and constructive bias mitigation.

  • 2017

Factors in Somali Culture that Prevent the Establishment of Centralized Governance

Author: Jason Salvog
Abstract:

The nation state of Somalia and its people have been on the periphery of global attention for the better part of the past three decades. During this time, the global community has branded Somalia as a failed state, with no legitimate functioning central government that provides for the population and represents the country internationally.  While there have been other countries labeled as failed states during this time, Somalia is unique in both the duration of this label and the number of attempts to make the country a productive member of the international community. The intent of this writing is to shed light and enhance the understanding of some of the aspects of the issues that exist in Somalia that have contributed to the failure to establish a legitimate and functioning central government. These failures are due both to the lack of cultural understanding by the donor nations and some of the cultural views held by a segment of the Somali population. The approaches that have either worked in donor nations or that the donor nations have had success with in nation building endeavors may not work in Somalia due to cultural differences and factors that external actors may be aware of but not truly understand. This paper highlights and offers potential solutions to some of the cultural issues that have prevented the Somalia from developing a legitimate, functioning government during this time despite support from the international community.