Accolades A Collection of Student Scholarship

Archives

Found 7 Accolades
  • 2015

The Military Business in Africa

Author: Joel Jones
Abstract:

In this paper I will discuss the economic impact of the military presence in the African country of Djibouti. I will discuss the history of Djibouti and how foreign military presence has rapidly grown and impacted the country’s economy, while also examining how political corruption and poor government leadership have marred the Djibouti economy.

  • 2015

The 1979 Islamic Revolution and its Threats to Economic Security

Author: William Hevener
Abstract:

This paper addresses the rise of the welfare state in the Islamic Republic of Iran and its growing threat to economic security. The paper shows that the political economy of the Islamic regime is driving decisions predicated on the protection and longevity of the regime rather than the growth and economic security of the nation. This paper also shows that the Islamic Republic has the potential for substantial economic growth if it is able to retract from its subversive foreign policy agenda in the Middle East; reduce welfare programs in favor of financial independence; move toward economic liberalism; deregulate domestic industry; and increase human rights practices.

  • 2014

Engaging the Maguindanao

Author: Sean O’Connor
Abstract:

The Maguindanao tribe has been a major influence in Mindanao, Philippines since the establishment of the Maguindanao Sultanate in the 1500s. The tribe is at the heart of the current instability within the Southern Philippines. This paper attempts to define the historical narrative of the Maguindanao tribe through a chronology of important defining aspects of Maguindanaon history and how that history affects the current stability in the Southern Philippines. From that it attempts to develop courses of action to be used in tribal engagement and conflict resolution in the Southern Philippines.

  • 2014

Combatting Boko Haram:

The Value of Community Engagement in Nigeria
Author: Aaron Williamson
Abstract:

This paper examines the current strategy of the Nigerian government in their efforts to combat the Islamic extremist group Boko Haram with military power and proposes a counterstrategy centered on community engagement. Since the uprising of the Boko Haram in 2009, the Nigerian government has undertaken a direct action campaign against Boko Haram that will not have a long-term stabilizing effect on Nigeria. This field study contends that although a state-centric approach is required to combat against non-state threats, the ongoing situation in Nigeria does not require a direct action campaign but rather a culturally competent approach focusing on community engagement used in parallel with counterinsurgency operations to mitigate the security threat posed to Nigeria by Boko Haram.

  • 2013

Counterinsurgencies in Afghanistan: A look back and a look forward

Author: Steve Grewell
Abstract:

This paper will study the similarities and differences in the British, Soviet, and American interventions in Afghanistan, specifically looking at their different approaches to counter insurgency.
 

  • 2013

Corporate Social Responsibility: An Ethical "Best Practice"

Author: Sean Johnson
Abstract:

Currently in academia and industry, a debate exists on what ethical responsibilities a multinational corporation owes to its various stakeholders and a proposed dichotomy has emerged. One side contends that the corporation's only ethical responsibility is to its shareholders while the other side counters that the overall good of all stakeholders must be the corporation's final ethical arbiter. This study proposes that the dichotomy is a false one as both sides are correct. Short-term profit at the expense of the social license to operate will have a significantly negative impact on the ability to generate long-term profit and is, therefore, not in the organization's self-interest. Except in the most extreme of circumstances, corporate-community interactions do not represent a zero-sum game. By recognizing that the dichotomy does not exist and true corporate self-interest is ethical, as represented by mutually beneficial arrangements between all stakeholders, industry can redouble its efforts to solve the real problem: the failure represented by conflict is a failure to understand and engage the nuanced complexities of the operational social context and maintain a social license to operate.

  • 2012

Will Turkey Survive

An Economic Study of the Newest Modern Democracy of the Islamic World
Author: Keith Filipp
Abstract:

This paper examines how Turkey has transformed from corruption and a failing economy to a thriving powerhouse on its way to becoming the second fastest growing economy in the world. The paper explores the dynamics of geopolitical challenges and how diplomacy, strong leadership, and a fresh democratic mind-set have realized positive economic results in Turkey. The paper goes on to explain how Turkey rekindled old foreign relationships to expand its global reach to other continents such as Africa. Finally, the piece addresses how critical Turkey is to the overall development and stability of the Middle East.