AccoladesA Collection of Student Scholarship

Archives

Found 8 Accolades
  • 2017

Annual Compliance Testing Project

Author: Melissa Pici
Abstract:

Annual compliance testing, while a requirement for many organizations, is not always managed as a formal project. The objective of this capstone project was to take a project that had been in place for 12 years in the technology organization without any formal project management and manage it through formal project management (PMI) requirements. In so doing, additional insight was provided to the organization as to actual compliance costs on a year-over-year basis and where cost and time overruns were being seen. Additionally, recommendations were made for streamlining the annual project to reduce costs and impact to the organization and employees while continuing to mitigate risk and meet compliance regulation requirements.

  • 2017

An Analysis of Harley Davidson, Inc.

Author: Allyson Bartlett
Abstract:

Founded in 1903, Harley-Davidson, Inc. is a market leader in the motorcycle industry, and recognized for its customer loyalty and unique relationship with American culture. The Harley-Davidson brand—alone—is renowned for its ability to command pricing and sustain its competitive positioning. Harley-Davidson’s competitive advantage is built on selling a lifestyle and an exclusive experience to its target market. While this differentiation strategy has led to its dominant market position, the future is less certain due to a host of internal and external factors. In order to sustain its competitive advantage, the company must continue to mitigate low scale economies, enhance its international presence, diversify its products and meet the needs of its changing consumer base—all without sacrificing its core existence. To that end, this paper provides an analysis of Harley-Davidson applying Michael Porter’s nine sources of uniqueness as well as recommendations to sustain market leadership, as well as information about the Harley brand and the appeals embodied in its image.

  • 2017

Maternal Mortality during Interwar America

Author: Tiffany Sakahara-Petersen
Abstract:

This paper focuses on interwar America during the 1920s and 1930s. Childbirth is one of the oldest experiences of humanity, and yet the narrative surrounding it has undergone more changes in the past two hundred years than in the thousands of years before. For most of human history, childbirth remained the nearly exclusive domain of women. Only during the most complicated births did a physician or his historical equivalent attend. By the end of World War II, almost all women gave birth in hospitals under the supervision of an obstetrician. Concurrently, the maternal mortality rate increased or remained at a high plateau until the late 1930s. The first half of the twentieth century was a dynamic time for women and there is little exploration on the relationship between this period for women and the significant drop in maternal mortality. After falling steadily for more than fifty years, the maternal mortality rate began to rise in the late 1980s. Currently, the United States has the highest maternal mortality rate among developed nations. If the rapid decrease in mortality in the 1930s had been due to actual improvements in care within obstetrics, improvements meant to ameliorate the labor experience and success rate, the mortality rate should not have reversed. What seems to have happened is that the medical community established their routines of care and control over the process, regardless of its overall safety for the mother and child, which did not permanently lower the mortality rate.

  • 2017

The Matryoshka Doll of the Russian Identity

Author: Trevor Yoak
Abstract:

Given the current political climate and the whimsy which plagues policy relating to Russia, all members of the electorate need to self-educate in order to increase awareness and the wherewithal to make rational decisions about American foreign policy. This paper unpacks some of the mystery and confusion of why Russia acts in certain ways by analyzing the transformation of the Russian identity throughout many eras. Delving into the cultural, historical, and religious aspects of how the average Russian views himself begins to give shape to the jigsaw, ultimately revealing common ground and talking points for future relations.

  • 2017

Andrew Jackson Versus Historians: How Changes in American Moralism Created a Monster

Author: Eric Draudt
Abstract:

Andrew Jackson was, and still is one of the most polarizing Presidents in the history of the United States. His face is on our currency, much like George Washington and Abraham Lincoln, yet, there isn’t an era of America named after them like Jackson. Washington belongs to the Revolutionary era and Lincoln belongs to the Civil War era, but Jackson belongs to the Age of Jackson. The Jacksonian Age saw a rebirth of Republican values, the spread of democracy, the rise of the common man, and the growth of federal power. These alone could keep historians arguing over Jackson indefinitely. However, the most controversial and hotly debated issue concerning Jackson’s presidency is Native American removal. Since his retirement from office, Jackson’s actions have generated debate over the legitimacy of the forced removal.

Recently, America has entered a new age of moralistic values. With little research, one can see a trend of when the defense of Jackson ended, and when the persecution began; the American Civil Rights Movement. The change in American moralism permeates through the pens of our historians, and turned a president who promoted American values, into a monster. Historians often make the mistake of using modern moralistic thought to interpret the past. While this makes for some interesting historical works, it does not make them historically accurate, and that remains true for the historiography of Andrew Jackson’s decision to remove the Natives.

  • 2017

Operation Cobra in 1944 in the European Theater of Operations (ETO)

Author: Carl Wayne Lowe
Abstract:

The unrecognized key factors that contributed to the performance of the United States Army Armored Force before Operation Cobra in 1944 in the European Theater of Operations (ETO). The interconnection of equipment, doctrine, and organization make it difficult to analyze and identify all the factors involved in determining the success or failure of U.S. forces at the beginning of World War II. Historians examining the mechanization of the United States Army and the transformation of cavalry during the interwar period cite the resource constrained environment, the competition between the Cavalry Branch and the Infantry Branch, the friction within the Cavalry Branch between the horse and mechanization factions, and the decentralized mechanization priorities as major factors affecting what occurred during that time. Most historians agree that these factors contributed to the marginal performance of the United States Army Armored Force in the European Theater of Operations before Operation Cobra in 1944. Many historians state these factors led to inferior tanks, organization, and doctrine. This paper examines three additional key factors that also contributed to the United States Army Armored Force’s marginal performance in the ETO before Operation Cobra in 1944: 1) the failure to deploy the M6 series of heavy tanks; 2) the failure of the U.S. Army education system to inculcate the doctrine with commanders and planners; and 3) the impact of the 90-division decision on the organization, rotation, and employment of armored forces and individual replacements.

  • 2017

Sierra Leone and the International Response

Author: Irene Khatib
Abstract:

Due to economic and political instability, Sierra Leone sunk into a decade long civil war, erupting in 1991 and ending in 2002. Discussed, is the international response to this debilitating war which led to the country's renewal and national hope for its people to live peacefully with each other and its neighboring states. Upon researching the Sierra Leone conflict, diplomats can become equipped with useful strategies on resolving similar conflicts in the future.

  • 2017

Japanese War Crimes in China: A Strategy of Popular Annihilation

Author: Virginia Hudgins
Abstract:

During the Second Sino-Japanese War and throughout World War II, Japanese soldiers committed atrocities on an incredible scale that included mass killings, rape, arson, and biological warfare. In China, these war crimes continued for eight years and resulted in the deaths of approximately 10 million Chinese civilians. The International Military Tribunal for the Far East (IMTFE) concluded in their “Judgment of 4 November 1948” that – based on the available evidence and testimony – “only one conclusion [was] possible – the atrocities were either secretly ordered or willfully permitted by the Japanese Government or individual members thereof and by the leaders of the armed forces.”  The IMTFE lacked crucial evidence. First, they were unaware of the actual start date of the atrocities. As a result, the war crimes seemed to begin randomly, and so could not be tied to a strategic motive. Second, they were unaware of the Japanese biological warfare program. The American government made a deal with Japanese scientists to trade immunity for information. Thus, the highest levels of the Imperial Japanese government could claim ignorance of certain atrocities, and the absence of command control for others. There were none that required specific funding and organization – until the biological warfare program surfaced. These two pieces of evidence change the narrative of the Japanese atrocities from disconnected actions with no clear strategic value to purposeful and planned war crimes that evolved as strategy dictated. The Japanese war crimes in China were essentially attempted genocide.