AccoladesA Collection of Student Scholarship

2017 Accolades

Accolades entries are organized by degree program. Each program section includes an overview of the featured student works followed by a listing of individual project abstracts for easy browsing.

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Master of Arts in Diplomacy View all accolades »

Students in the Master of Arts in Diplomacy program examine international relations from a historical, political, geographical, and cultural perspective. The following student works reflect a wide variety of topics within the concentrations of international conflict management, international terrorism, and international commerce.

  • 2017
  • Master of Arts in Diplomacy

Sierra Leone and the International Response

Author: Irene Khatib
Abstract:

Due to economic and political instability, Sierra Leone sunk into a decade long civil war, erupting in 1991 and ending in 2002. Discussed, is the international response to this debilitating war which led to the country's renewal and national hope for its people to live peacefully with each other and its neighboring states. Upon researching the Sierra Leone conflict, diplomats can become equipped with useful strategies on resolving similar conflicts in the future.

  • 2017
  • Master of Arts in Diplomacy

Terrorism and Insurgency Revisited

Author: Brittany Biglari
Abstract:

Terrorism and insurgencies as strategies, have been conducted on behalf of states and have occurred within states, by non-state entities in the Middle East. While the contexts of terrorism and those of an insurgency are distinct in its features, there is much contention surrounding the application, as terrorists have waged both terrorism and an insurgency at the same time in efforts to shape varying political outcomes.

This paper will seek to explore the differences between insurgencies and terrorism as strategies specifically within Iraq, and the West's counterinsurgency and counterterrorism responses in addressing such issues, specifically through the use of force and repressive responses. Furthermore, this paper will explore how counterinsurgency and counterterrorism approaches are conducted in accordance to international law, and any implications which occur as a result of this application, in terms of the West's capacity to respond.

  • 2017
  • Master of Arts in Diplomacy

The KGB in the Kremlin: Vladimir Putin and the "Vertikal" of Power

Author: Cedric Crawley
Abstract:

Since March 2000, Vladimir Vladimirovich Putin has ruled Russia. From his ascension to power after the downfall of former Russian president Boris Yeltsin, Putin has created a “vertikal” of power that has ensured his continued reign over the Russian state for the last sixteen years. And, if current indications continue, he may go on governing his homeland for perhaps decades to come. Putin’s “vertikal” is not simply the unquestioned domination of one man, but a system of control where his personal apparatchiks declare loyalty to a Putinist Russia and are then seeded into positions of authority where their individual ambitions – and in the case of Russia’s financial oligarchs, their vast wealth – serve the interests of the state first and foremost. It is a system combining, for now, a soft autocracy with all the overlays of social democracy. But how did Vladimir Putin arrive here? And how did he build this vast network of near-unchallenged authority? To understand the Putin of today it is essential to know the Putin of yesterday, what shaped him, what motivated him, and what overriding mission compels him forward in the modern era. Is he simply driven by a strong nationalist pride to exalt Russia once more to a central place on the world stage, or is there more? This investigation looks at the young KGB officer who was Vladimir Putin and projects the lines about what the world may expect from the man who is now President Putin, leader of the Russian Federation.

  • 2017
  • Master of Arts in Diplomacy

The Rise of ISIS and the Partial Collapse of the Iraqi State

A result of Prime Minister Nourri al-Maliki’s policies at the Political, Economic and Military Level
Author: Samuel-Alexandre Mercier
Abstract:

Since his appointment as Prime Minister in 2006, Nouri Al-Maliki moved to centralize the political apparatus in Iraq by limiting the power of the Iraqi Parliament and the cabinet to influence state practices. Between 2006 and 2012, Maliki greatly deteriorated the ability of formal institutions to enact their mandate within the governmental apparatus and managed to place his office as Prime Minister at the center of Iraqi Power politics. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the impacts of Maliki’s sectarian policies in the political, economic and military apparatus and how such practices have paved the way for the rise of ISIS.