AccoladesA Collection of Student Scholarship

2016 Accolades

Accolades entries are organized by degree program. Each program section includes an overview of the featured student works followed by a listing of individual project abstracts for easy browsing.

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Master of Arts in Diplomacy View all accolades »

Students in the Master of Arts in Diplomacy program examine international relations from a historical, political, geographical, and cultural perspective. The following student works reflect a wide variety of topics within the concentrations of international conflict management, international terrorism, and international commerce.

  • 2016
  • Master of Arts in Diplomacy

Turkey’s Kurdish Question – Featuring an Overview of Broader Implications of Turkey’s Policy Decisions for U.S. Foreign Policy in the Region

Author: Hatice Gamze Menali
Abstract:

During the creation of new nation-states after World War I (Treaty of Sèvres, 1920), there was a strong possibility that there would also be a Kurdish state in the Middle East. With Turkey, Iraq and Iran agreeing not to recognize an independent Kurdish state, the issue of Kurdish independence had not even been included in the subsequent Treaty of Lausanne (1923). An almost century-long conflict recently took a new identity with Kurdish fighters including the PKK (currently recognized as a terrorist organization by both Turkey and the U.S.) and its affiliates taking the front lines in the fight against the Islamic State (IS) in Syria, as well as in Iraq (Peshmerga forces). As Turkey’s Kurdish question continues to present a challenge for both the scholars and practitioners of international relations (IR) and diplomacy from the standpoint of conflict resolution, Turkey’s Kurdish policy concerning the century-long Kurdish-Turkish conflict has broader implications throughout Syria and Iraq, considering the two other major conflicts going on in the region. This research mainly focuses on the Kurdish conflict in Turkey with the intent to examine the fabric of the Turkish-Kurdish conflict; identify some of the relevant issues and outside elements factoring in; and elaborate on what has been achieved and what still remains to be done for a long-lasting solution to the conflict.

  • 2016
  • Master of Arts in Diplomacy

Understanding Lone Wolf Terrorism

Author: Rachel Cote
Abstract:

In order to effectively prevent future lone wolf terrorism in America, one must first understand its origins from the white supremacist movements in America. Analyzing the foundations and psychology behind lone wolf terrorism is the first step in preventing it. Since lone wolves utilize the Internet as their form of frequent communication and education in ideology, the government needs to take a closer look at the Internet, and use it as a tool to track down the terrorists. Through working with the American people to create better privacy laws that allow the government to watch the Internet closer, there is a chance that preventing lone wolf terrorism is possible.

  • 2016
  • Master of Arts in Diplomacy

Weaknesses of international law on anti-trafficking: A case study of Haiti

Author: Amy Y. Ngurukie
Abstract:

Haiti once known as the “Pearl of the Caribbean” and the richest island in the Caribbean has for years been plagued with myriad of unfortunate events from natural disasters to political instability that have contributed to Haiti becoming the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere. One major phenomenon that has swept over the country is the issue of human trafficking especially of women and children both internally, and across borderlines. The rise in human trafficking has greatly increased since the 2010 earthquake, but to date Haiti does not have any legal recourse to persecute traffickers, or protect victims of trafficking. This essay will define how the U.S State Department ranks countries based on The Trafficking Victims Protection Act (TVPA) minimum standards; tackle the phenomenon of human trafficking in Haiti that has greatly increased since the fall of dictator President Jean-Claude Duvalier in 1986 to include the underlying causes of trafficking in Haiti, and the role or lack of the Haitian Government in combating trafficking; the role of International Law and the United Nations entity that is responsible for eliminating trafficking globally; and the weaknesses in international law in combating human trafficking in Haiti. In conclusion this essay will seek to provide recommendations and areas that international law can start to implement to address issues of trafficking by having an accountability mechanism in place where donors can hold the government of Haiti accountable on their compliance with international law, protocols and minimum standards to eliminate trafficking, but also how the Government of Haiti can take steps internally for international law to be effective long term.

  • 2016
  • Master of Arts in Diplomacy

Why has the West turned a blind eye to ISIS-controlled oil infrastructure in Syria, allowing ISIS to self-fund terrorist operations?

Author: Brandon Turturro
Abstract:

The Islamic State of Iraq and Syria in the Middle East is shifting the geopolitics of oil. The disruption of Iraq and Syrian oil production and exportation is making a direct impact on the international energy market and the stability of the global community, creating serious challenges for diplomatic relations for security, interests, and economies. By ISIS holding the “keys to the global economy” of the world’s oil reserves, ISIS continues to remain a threat to the international community. Thus, querying a legitimate concern why ISIS continues to thrive in Syria among its commandeered oil facilities is an accurate question one asks when ISIS continues to make media headlines and remains difficult to eliminate after ten years of conflict. This research paper identifies the importance in eliminating ISIS-controlled oil operations and the reasons for passive efforts in eliminating ISIS-controlled oil infrastructure. It seeks to address whether ISIS oil operations will shift to new international locations and explores strategies to prevent further expansion.

  • 2016
  • Master of Arts in Diplomacy

Women in Terrorism

Author: Renee Stewart
Abstract:

This essay will discuss an important, yet often overlooked part of terrorist groups: women. The traditional image of a Muslim terrorist involves darker skin men, with long beards, wearing a long white turban or military style uniforms. Increasingly terrorism has expanded beyond this image and can include women, children, and people from all social classes and areas of the world. In order to find ways to combat terrorism it is necessary to define where the threat is coming from, to study the terrorists themselves. As time goes on it is apparent that women are becoming more and more involved in terrorism. The purpose of this essay is to explore women's interest in terrorism, why these instances are increasing, and how this impacts terrorism globally. The essay will describe several prominent case studies of women's involvement with terrorism. The essay posits that instances of female terrorism are increasing in the 21st century, and will consider how and why female terrorism is on the rise. Finally, the impact of female terrorism on global jihad, and other terrorist movements will be analyzed. This essay will conclude with ideas for counterterrorism strategies as they relate to female terrorists. This is an important topic, as gender considerations continue to develop in the 21st century.