AccoladesA Collection of Student Scholarship

2017 Accolades

Accolades entries are organized by degree program. Each program section includes an overview of the featured student works followed by a listing of individual project abstracts for easy browsing.

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Master of Civil Engineering View all accolades »

Students in the Master of Civil Engineering program pursue one of four tracks in geotechnical engineering, structural engineering, environmental/water resources engineering, or construction management. Reflecting Norwich’s institutional emphasis on learning and doing and the program’s dual cultivation of technical and business acumen, all of the following student projects involve a real-world civil engineering design or management challenge.

  • 2017
  • Master of Civil Engineering

Budget Home Expansion

Author: Guido Rivas
Abstract:

This project will generally consist of the planning necessary for research, design, and implementation of a business model that will provide tools, materials, and detailed instructions for a home expansion using a modular design deliverable. Materials are delivered to a client with pre-cut and marked members along with the proper tools for optimal project completion. The client will have access to detailed instructions from initial survey to final inspection by the local governance. The goal of this project is to enable the budget minded client with novice to intermediate knowledge of general construction to have hands-on involvement in the expansion of their residential home.

  • 2017
  • Master of Civil Engineering

Challenges and Risks in the Adoption and Implementation of Building Information Modeling in the Architectural, Engineering and Construction Industry

Author: Neway Mengesha
Abstract:

The use of Building Information Modelling (BIM) in the Architectural, Engineering and Construction (AEC) industry is growing rapidly. BIM has changed the way projects are executed in the AEC industry. However, the adoption and implementation of BIM in the AEC industry has encountered many challenges and risks. The focus of this project is to identify and examine the factors that hinder the adoption and implementation process of BIM and the risks involved for using BIM in projects in the AEC industry. First, the theoretical concepts of BIM and its benefits in the AEC industry are discussed. Second, the factors that influence the adoption and implementation of BIM as well as the challenges in the AEC industry are widely presented. Then, legal/contractual and technical risks involved in the BIM process are identified and examined. Finally, the impacts of BIM in terms of the risks to the architects/engineers, contractors, and owners are evaluated. The data and information has been administered through literature reviews and previously studied case studies to illustrate the benefits and risks for using BIM in the AEC industry.

  • 2017
  • Master of Civil Engineering

The Utility-Squared Project: Design Framework for Achieving the Sustainable Centralization of Municipal Utility Services in Developing Countries and Emerging Markets

Author: Robert Hanlon
Abstract:

The modern, urbanized society has become reliant on five key services to sustain a healthy and functioning populace, at any measurable scale; (1) access to a stable food supply, (2) availability of treated (potable) water, (3) the effective removal and treatment of wastewater, (4) the proper disposal of municipal solid waste, and (5) the availability of usable energy (e.g. electricity, fuel). As the recent decade has demonstrated, the stability and global status of a nation at large may be compromised if these services are interrupted, compromised, or simply not provided at the necessary capacities. The Utility2 Project presented in this paper represents the framework for an organization, comprised of two components; the U1 Program and U2 Facility, which deliver the five key services for an underserviced population. While developed countries and societies benefit from an established and functioning system of utility infrastructure and provisions, the prospective Target Locations for this design study are not as fortunate; the Utility2 Project implements a grass-roots approach in developing regions, presently void of such services or providers, like so many that currently exist in emerging markets and developing countries (e.g. India, southeast Asia, Eastern Europe), along with the many war-torn regions left without functioning municipalities and infrastructure. Using a combination of novel technologies, Big-Picture engineering, and a Projectized Organization with non-profit-values, the Utility2 Project’s objective is to provide a readily feasible solution to this global problem.