Accolades A Collection of Student Scholarship

2017 Accolades

Master of Arts in Diplomacy View all accolades »

Students in the Master of Arts in Diplomacy program examine international relations from a historical, political, geographical, and cultural perspective. The following student works reflect a wide variety of topics within the concentrations of international conflict management, international terrorism, and international commerce.

  • 2017
  • Master of Arts in Diplomacy

Cyber Strategic Relations Between the United States and the Republic of Korea

Author: Arlene Drew
Abstract:

This paper analyzes the cyber strategic relations between the United States of America and the Republic of Korea through historical and cultural lenses. The two nations created a strong military partnership for the overt reason of defending the region against the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea to the north. Historical and cultural factors have shaped the way the alliance operates, while developments in cyber capabilities and impactful events have directed its actions and motives in cyber defense. Other major actors and methods of cooperation also shape cyber diplomacy in the Asia-Pacific region. This paper examines the specific system used by the U.S.-ROK alliance called CENTRIXS-K and how it should be strengthened for the future. It also provides a cultural explanation for why relations have turned out the way they have, through civil-military relations and Greer Hofstede’s cultural dimensions. Finally, the foundations revealed in this paper highlight the current and future threats for cyber relations, while the limitations of this project and currently unfolding events point the way that future research should go.

  • 2017
  • Master of Arts in Diplomacy

Examination of Purported U.S. Violations of International Law during the Bombardment of Yugoslavia in 1999

Author: Maribeth Sawchuk
Abstract:

The U.S. led NATO bombardment of Yugoslavia in 1999 has long been defended as a necessary intervention due to atrocious human rights violations against Muslim and Croat Bosnians. However, those that supported and opposed the conflict point to U.S. violations of international law and despair at unpunished violations, a flawed system, and call for reform. Even the former Secretary of State, Madeline Albright has publicly admitted that U.S. actions were ‘technically’ a violation of international law but these actions were warranted given the region’s humanitarian crisis; was this really the case? If so, what specific laws were violated and are these purported violations indicative of a super power’s disregard for international law or a flawed system of laws that fail to account for the nuance of sociopolitical timing, the emphatic response to human rights violations, and the practical reality of timely military engagement?

  • 2017
  • Master of Arts in Diplomacy

Failed Reconstruction in the Forever War

Author: Peter Bue
Abstract:

This research paper addresses the question of why post-war reconstruction efforts in Afghanistan have failed. It explains how following the success of the conduct of America’s Operation Enduring Freedom, Afghanistan went through a complex transition from a state of war to a state of peace. The end of the war brought security, political, economic, and social problems that must be examined in order to ascertain why reconstruction efforts failed.

  • 2017
  • Master of Arts in Diplomacy

Gods & Guns

Author: Justin Bardowski
Abstract:

This is a research paper on how religion has played such a huge role in the development of our international community. It is written through the lens of constructivism.

  • 2017
  • Master of Arts in Diplomacy

North Korea’s Juche Ideology and its Prevention of Progress

Author: Arron Miller
Abstract:

The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, also known as the Hermit Kingdom has instituted a cult of personality that virtually shut down the country’s progress. The pursuit of self-reliance through a military first policy has isolated North Korea from the rest of the world and forced its infrastructure to the edge of collapse.  Three generations of one family’s rule has bred an oppressive regime that has is able to hide behind a veil of extreme social control.

  • 2017
  • Master of Arts in Diplomacy

Post-Conflict Resolution: What is Syria's Future?

Author: Yariana Rodriguez
Abstract:

The paper discusses how post-conflict reconstruction techniques can aid the planning of Syria's eventual reconstruction after the Civil War. Given the challenges that Syria faces with its current war, no matter which side comes out as victorious, the international community must come together now to implement a reconstruction plan for Syria. This project takes a look at the history of Syria's Civil War and how post-conflict reconstruction techniques can aid a better future for Syria, which will depend on the actions the international community takes now. Regardless of this war’s outcome, it is imperative that the international community start a reconstruction plan prior to the conflict's end.

  • 2017
  • Master of Arts in Diplomacy

Preemptive Self-Defense, Customary International Law, and the Congolese Wars

Author: Patrick Kelly
Abstract:

Perhaps no event—aside from the Rwandan Genocide itself—demonstrated both the failings and urgent need for effective international law than the First and Second Congolese Wars. However, these conflicts occurred not merely due to a state of lawlessness, but rather, state actors—notably Rwanda and Uganda—would claim their actions were completely in keeping with international rules governing military intervention. In contrast, the Democratic Republic of the Congo alleged violations of both international and humanitarian law occurred from such acts of armed intervention.

Initially considered invalid by the ICJ—which claimed the actions of both countries were not in keeping with the language of the UN Charter and, thus, in violation of international humanitarian and human rights obligations—the actions of Rwanda and Uganda were not entirely different from that described in the National Security Strategy of 2002. What seems to have undergone a change is the acceptance of preemptive self-defense—especially when combating non-state actors like al-Qaeda and the Taliban. Certainly, the post-9/11 security demands of the international community motivated this change. The ICJ has yet to review the matter of preemptive self-defense; however, the practice and policy of states—most notably the United States—has instead begun to incorporate a claim of preemptive self-defense into customary international law. Retrospective analysis would likely see the actions of Rwanda and Uganda, at least in part, validated. The effects of this development have yet to be fully experienced, though if nothing else, it demonstrates the dynamic nature of customary law.

  • 2017
  • Master of Arts in Diplomacy

Sierra Leone and the International Response

Author: Irene Khatib
Abstract:

Due to economic and political instability, Sierra Leone sunk into a decade long civil war, erupting in 1991 and ending in 2002. Discussed, is the international response to this debilitating war which led to the country's renewal and national hope for its people to live peacefully with each other and its neighboring states. Upon researching the Sierra Leone conflict, diplomats can become equipped with useful strategies on resolving similar conflicts in the future.