Weaknesses of international law on anti-trafficking: A case study of Haiti

  • 2016

Weaknesses of international law on anti-trafficking: A case study of Haiti

Author:
Amy Y. Ngurukie
Abstract:

Haiti once known as the “Pearl of the Caribbean” and the richest island in the Caribbean has for years been plagued with myriad of unfortunate events from natural disasters to political instability that have contributed to Haiti becoming the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere. One major phenomenon that has swept over the country is the issue of human trafficking especially of women and children both internally, and across borderlines. The rise in human trafficking has greatly increased since the 2010 earthquake, but to date Haiti does not have any legal recourse to persecute traffickers, or protect victims of trafficking. This essay will define how the U.S State Department ranks countries based on The Trafficking Victims Protection Act (TVPA) minimum standards; tackle the phenomenon of human trafficking in Haiti that has greatly increased since the fall of dictator President Jean-Claude Duvalier in 1986 to include the underlying causes of trafficking in Haiti, and the role or lack of the Haitian Government in combating trafficking; the role of International Law and the United Nations entity that is responsible for eliminating trafficking globally; and the weaknesses in international law in combating human trafficking in Haiti. In conclusion this essay will seek to provide recommendations and areas that international law can start to implement to address issues of trafficking by having an accountability mechanism in place where donors can hold the government of Haiti accountable on their compliance with international law, protocols and minimum standards to eliminate trafficking, but also how the Government of Haiti can take steps internally for international law to be effective long term.