Re-examining Collective Security: NATO’s Future and Lessons from the League of Nations

  • 2016

Re-examining Collective Security: NATO’s Future and Lessons from the League of Nations

Author:
Zachariah Dickens
Abstract:

Collective security as NATO’s purported means of deterrence in addition to the abstract, yet universal defense guarantees that it offers to prospective members requires a re-examination in light of current circumstances. Compounding the ambiguity of a policy centered on unspecified threats, NATO’s expansionism post-1991 has had an unduly destabilizing effect on pan-European security through the security guarantees provided to the buffer states that encompass this expansion. Looking to historical precedent, The League of Nations provides a definitive example of collective security’s failure to counter threats to stability. I’ve used research from varying of sources including modern day sources regarding the Ukrainian Crisis and European Western sentiments were remarkably easy to come by. In regards to the League of Nations, the most telling resource used was “Diplomacy” by former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger in regards to collective security’s failings, and Jari Eloranta’s essay on the League’s failings in regards to both disarmament the security system. Through an analysis of both the League and present day NATO, I have been able to draw a direct correlation between the faults of the League of Nations and how NATO currently suffers from the same issues.