Utilizing Nursing Theory to Provide Nursing Education on the TOLLOS Patient Lift System in Critical Care

  • 2016

Utilizing Nursing Theory to Provide Nursing Education on the TOLLOS Patient Lift System in Critical Care

Author:
Marcia DePolo
Abstract:

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2015), those who are in healthcare occupations have a twofold higher rate of musculoskeletal injuries than other professions at 76 per 10,000 workers in 2011. Implementing the use of the mechanical Patient Lift System (PLS) can reduce risk of injury to nurses and patients, providing that the equipment is utilized appropriately. The rise of obesity makes it more challenging for nurses to mobilize patients. Utilization of a PLS will assist the nursing staff in meeting patient outcomes such as optimizing patient mobility and preventing skin breakdown and complications from immobility. The lifts enable the nurse to independently reposition a patient in bed or to move a patient from bed to chair and back. Education for the nursing staff on the use of the PLS presents challenges due to the different maturity levels and length of service of the staff, shift work, reluctance to change, time commitment, and lack of knowledge regarding the importance of utilizing a lift system. In setting up a program for nursing education, three theories will be intertwined to meet learning needs and competency goals. Theories that will be applied to the educational plan are Marilyn Ray’s Theory of Bureaucratic Caring, Malcolm Knowles’ Assumptions of Adult Learners and Patricia Benner’s Theory of Nursing Practice Expertise and the Novice to Expert Model.