Coercive Diplomacy as Foreign Policy in Conflict and Crisis Management

  • 2013

Coercive Diplomacy as Foreign Policy in Conflict and Crisis Management

Author:
Gordette Leutz
Abstract:

While international consensus remains the broadest basis of legitimization of the foreign policy implementations of states, consensus of the national political center enacted by the U.S. presidency is also essential. Contemporary international systemic changes altering the conceptual properties of the nature of U.S. state interest and threat, however, have created a marked change in ideological values regarding foreign policy, shifting not only foreign policy priorities, but the political center of its power as well. A new national security paradigm of "peaceful coexistence" and the "balance of terror" has created a centralization of national security policy formation as well as an expanded use of coercive diplomacy in implementing U.S. foreign interests. The use of coercive diplomacy in military and economic applications, while effective in some instances, is in danger of overuse, and accounts for the conditions of national insecurity and international instability that it intends to resolve. This leaves the question of its legitimacy in contemporary application. The legitimizing distinction lies in the use of coercive diplomacy in implementing foreign policy not only through deterrence, but also through compelling measures.